New Capability Added To RockWorks16 For Automatically Computing Horizontal Well Path

This video describes a new capability whereby RockWorks16 can be used to automatically determine the path for a horizontal well that starts out as a vertical borehole at a designated location and then curves (based on a user-defined radius of curvature) into a pay-zone as defined by two grid models.  The path will then automatically route itself along the mid-line of the two surfaces until reaching a user-defined point.

Caveat: This program assumes that hole starts out vertically.

How To Export Diagrams From RockWorks16 Into Google Earth

Two new videos showing how to export diagrams from RockWorks16 into Google Earth have been uploaded to YouTube.  The short version is 2 minutes and skips all of the “how-it-works” information.  The long version is 12 minutes and provides a description of what goes on “behind the scenes”.

Please note that these videos do not cover the EarthApps portion of RockWorks which directly exports to Google Earth.  Instead, these videos show how to export existing 2-D diagrams (maps, profiles and sections) from RockPlot2D and 3-D diagrams (logs and block models) from RockPlot3D into Google Earth.

Short Version:

Extended Version:


Examples of Non-English Text Output Provided by RockWorks16’s Unicode Support


Strange Log Appears Far Above Other Logs When Hanging Section on Selected Stratigraphic Horizon


If you’re hanging a section relative to a stratigraphic horizon within RockWorks16, and you see a strange log floating way above all of the other logs, here’s what’s going on …

The offending borehole does not contain any reference to the stratigraphic unit (in this example, the top of the Potosi Formation) that was selected as the datum.  As a consequence, it remains at it’s correct structural elevation while all of the other logs have been vertically offset such that the datum contact is adjusted to an elevation of zero.  In other words, the program is working just fine – but a fat lot of good that will get you.

Here’s the solution …

Step 1.  Zoom in on the offending log …


Step 2.  Make note of the log ID.  In this case, that’s “DH-05”.  This, of course, assumes that you have elected to plot the log titles within your cross section.  If not, turn on the titles and try again.

Step 3.  Uncheck the offending log within the Borehole Manager database.


4.  Re-run the cross-section program …


5.  Be happy.


New Video Using Multi-Seam Coal Data to Demonstrate RockWare Command Language (RCL) Scripting

New Video: Using the RockWare Command Language (RCL) to Automate Cross-Section Generation

New Version of RockWorks16 (2013.8.8) Available

Click here to download ...

Click image to download latest version.

Master Directory of RockWare YouTube Videos

The YouTube playlists have proven to be somewhat cumbersome, so we have created a hyper-linked master index that makes it easier to find content.  Check it out …


RockWare YouTube Video Index URL:

Creating Batch PDF Output for Your LogPlot Logs

If you want to create PDF output of a bunch of logs created with LogPlot7, you can automate this using the Log | Batch Compile menu command. Here are the steps I’ve taken to set this up. NOTE that this requires that you have a PDF program, such as Adobe Acrobat Pro, or any of the free PDF printers (PDF995, CutePDF, etc. – see RockWare forum postings regarding these) installed as a printer in your Windows system.

1. First, be sure you’re using a build of LogPlot7 that is or newer.

2. Set up your PDF printer as the default printer in LogPlot, using the program’s File |  Setup command. (On some systems you may also need to set up the PDF printer as default in the Windows Control Panel before launching LogPlot.)

3. You can set up the page size for the printer as well.

LogPlot Page Setup window

Setting up the PDF Printer Page Size

4. Set up the PDF printer driver to NOT prompt for PDF file names, and set the output folder to the same folder where the data files reside. I’ve attached an example of what my Acrobat Professional screen looks like, though your version or your PDF printing software may be different. Note that this is an important step so that you won’t be prompted for each PDF output file name.

PDF Print Settings

PDF Print Settings

5. Then, select the Log | Batch Compile menu option in LogPlot.

6. Click the Add button, and in the Batch Editor window define the name of the data file, the log design, scale, and other compile settings. Be sure Print is selected, and be sure the Save as LPT file is also selected and a name defined. (The PDF file name will be based on the LPT name you define here.)

7. Click OK when you’re done, and you’ll see this log’s items listed in the batch window.

LogPlot Batch Window

LogPlot Batch Window

8. Repeat for additional files, though you might start with just a handful to get the hang of it and to be sure the PDF files are actually being created.

9. Save your batch at some point, using the Save button in the Batch Compile window. At a later date, you can use the Load button in this window to load an already-saved batch listing.

! Note: the BTC file that is created is an ASCII XML-type file. If it is easier for you to modify the BTC file directly to add other logs, you certainly may do so, just be careful about the XML syntax.

10. To run the batch, just click the Go button at the bottom of the Batch Compile window. LogPlot should load the selected DAT file, compile it into the selected LDFX file using the indicated settings, save the requested LPT file, and print to PDF, storing the PDF file in the requested folder.  It will repeat this process for each item listed in the batch.

11. If you want to append all of the PDF’s into a single file, you can use Adobe Acrobat’s File | Combine | Merge Files menu option.