Cloud-Based RockWorks Project Collaboration Using Microsoft OneDrive (Formerly SkyDrive)

Introduction

The Microsoft OneDrive cloud capability is great for collaboration with individual Microsoft Office data files (e.g. Word “docx” and Excel “xlsx”). Unfortunately, this is not the case for non-Microsoft products such as RockWorks that access multiple, non-Microsoft files (e.g. grid and block models) that reside within a project folder. We recently discovered a work-around that allows multiple users to share the same, cloud-hosted RockWorks project simultaneously. This is a welcome alternative to the classic (expensive) method of hosting the database on a corporate network server and accessing the network via a VPN (Virtual Private Network).

JimR (left) at his office in Svalbard, Norway looking at an I-Data model that was just created by TomB at his office in Bouvet Island, Antartica. Simultaneously, TomB is looking at a stratigraphy model that was just created by JimR. Both users are editing and modeling from the same RockWorks database! Ok, this is an exaggeration. We’re actually in the same office in Golden, Colorado but it does work for all locations with Internet access.

Terminology

  • Cloud: Yeah right, like we’re going to provide a formal description for “The Cloud”. Fat chance. Here’s a pretty good description/rant from Alex Barnett: http://alexbarnett.net/blog/archive/2007/04/04/what-is-the-internet-cloud_3F00_.aspx
  • Owner: The person who initially sets up the RockWorks project folder on OneDrive.
  • Subordinate: Someone who was “invited” by the Owner to collaborate on the RockWorks project.  Don’t use this terminology if one of the subordinates is your boss.

Pros & Cons

We’re not saying that OneDrive is a perfect solution. There are some advantages and some disadvantages to using OneDrive for collaboratively working with RockWorks data.

Microsoft OneDrive

Network Server & VPN

Cost

Free(1)

Expensive(2)

Speed

Slow

Fast(3)

Setup Complexity

Easy

Difficult(4)

Requires Microsoft Account For All Users

Yes

No

Project Owner Can Work w/Data Offline

Yes(5)

No

Subordinates Can Work w/Data Offline

No

No

  1. The first 7 gigabytes are free.
  2. Assuming that you don’t already have a network server and VPN capability.
  3. Speed depends upon the VPN connection.
  4. Typically requires a network/internet administrator.
  5. Notice the “Owner” caveat. Offline users who are accessing the data via drive-mapping cannot access data.

Microsoft OneDrive

The Microsoft OneDrive cloud capability is an integral part of Windows 8.1. If you’re a Windows 7 or 8.0 user, you’ll need to install the free OneDrive software from Microsoft and create a Microsoft user account if you don’t already have one.

Creating a Cloud-Based RockWorks Project Folder

  1. Select the Create New Project option from the Project Folder pull-down menu.

  1. Click on the file-folder icon within the Create New Project Wizard.

  2. Click on the OneDrive folder within the Browse For Folder menu.

  3. Here’s where things start to get a bit “squirrely”. You’ll notice that the folder is called “SkyDrive”. This is a vestigial remnant from the former name for OneDrive. To make a long story short, Microsoft lost a trademark case with Sky Broadcasting Group of Britain.

  4. Add a backslash (“\”) character and the name of your new project to the name of the New Project Folder.

  5. Continue with the remaining steps within the New Project Wizard until the main RockWorks menu displays the name of the new project.

    At this point, you may be thinking that the project data is stored within your C-drive. Well (leap of faith moment), it’s not. The data is actually stored in “the cloud”. The actual information that’s stored within the C-drive is just a “re-direct” to some server(s) within a server farm in Southern Timbuktu. Microsoft has gone to great lengths to integrate this cloud linkage directly into the Windows 8.1 operating system to make things fairly transparent especially if you are the person who initially stuck it there (the owner).

    Microsoft server farm in Southern Timbuktu. Ok, this really isn’t a server farm, but it’s better than those overused cartoons of clouds. Image source: http://worldsincredible.blogspot.com/2011/06/timbuktu-city-in-northeastern-mali.html

Setting Up a Local, Automatically-Synchronized Copy of the RockWorks Project Folder

If you anticipate that you may need to access this RockWorks project when you don’t have access to the Internet (e.g. that sleazy hotel in Baker, California), Microsoft’s integration with Windows provides a very cool feature that differentiates it from Google-Drive, I-Drive, Box.com, DropBox, etc. Specifically, you can designate that the project folder will be available when you’re offline. Here’s how:

  1. Activate the Windows File Explorer program (formerly called “Windows Explorer”) and right-click on the RockWorks project folder that you just created with the OneDrive group.

  2. A popup menu will appear that includes an option labeled “Make available offline“. Clicking on this option will make the project folder available when you’re not connected to the Internet. In addition to the obvious benefits of this configuration, Windows will magically synchronize this version with the version in the cloud when communication is re-established. Another advantage of this configuration is that RockWorks will run much faster for the “owner” of the project.

    Note: This off-line/on-line capability only applies to the Owner of the data in regards to RockWorks projects.

Making the Cloud-Based RockWorks Project Available To Other Users

  1. The aforementioned Windows File Explorer popup that appears when you click on the folder that contains the cloud-based RockWorks project also includes an option labeled “Share with“. Click on this option and then select the “OneDrive” sub-option.

  1. At this stage, Windows will load your Microsoft OneDrive management screen into the default web browser and present you with the sharing invitation screen. Enter the email address for whoever you want to collaborate with (a “subordinate”), along with an optional greeting/instructions and press the Share button.

  1. The default sharing condition when you invite someone to share your project is “Can only view“, meaning that they can look at the project but they can’t change anything. This is obviously not “collaboration” in the war-crimes sense of the word. To allow the invited party to actually add and edit data, you must;

     

    1. click on the project folder from within the OneDrive account manager,
    2. select the invited party,
    3. click on the pull-down option labeled “Can only view”, and
    4. change their “privileges” to “Allow editing”.

Mapping a Drive to the Shared Project

Note: The following information applies only to subordinates. It does not apply to the owner (person who created the RockWorks project within the OneDrive cloud).

 The invited party will now receive an email that looks something like this:

This is very nice if we’re sharing a single file but with RockWorks, we need to share an entire project folder. That’s where things fell apart and we just about gave up on RockWorks project collaboration via OneDrive until discovering a work-around that involves “mapping” a drive letter to a URL. The following steps are admittedly clunky so pay attention.

  1. At this stage, we need to determine the CID (Content-ID) for the project folder. This is accomplished by the following steps:
    1. Return to the OneDrive account manager,
    2. right-click on the project folder to be shared,
    3. select the “Share” option from popup menu,
    4. click on the “Get a link” option, and
    5. notice the “View only” URL.

       

       

  2. Copy everything between the “=” character and the “&” character to the Windows clipboard. In the example above, this would be “73D3124233C588F!8846″.

     

  3. Launch the Windows File Explorer program, right-click on “This PC” and select the “Map Network Drive” option from the pop-up menu.

     

     

  4. The next step is to designate the URL that contains the RockWorks project folder as the location that the “Z” drive will be assigned to. In the following example, that should read;

    https://d.docs.live.net/73D3124233C588F/

    Notice that the letters within the CID number must all be in upper case and the address should be terminated by a forward slash (“/”).

     

  5. Assuming that the URL was entered correctly, the invited party will now be prompted to enter their Windows account ID and password. If their email matches an email address within the owners invitation list, the Z-drive (or whatever drive was specified within the previous menu) will now be mapped to the designated URL address.

     

     

  6. If everything went well, you’ll be able to see the newly mapped drive within the Windows File Explorer program.

     

     

  7. Finally, the subordinate collaborator(s) will be able to access and edit the shared RockWorks project by selecting the newly assigned drive.

     

Afterthoughts

Whew! After writing up this blog entry, this process seems to be much more difficult that it really was. Although I’m sure that this has something to do with describing it in detail, it certainly wasn’t intuitive. We’re hoping that Microsoft will eventually streamline the process so that folders (not just files) shared with other users (subordinates) can be more easily integrated into the subordinates’ Windows folder listings. It would also be very useful if the subordinates could have the same automatic synchronization capabilities with an offline-version as the owner.

Acknowledgements

We are deeply indebted to Olivier Fontana (http://olivierfontana.wordpress.com/2013/02/07/skydrivefromwindowsexplorer/) for posting the drive mapping “work-around” on his blog site.

Windows Tablet Sensor Comparison Chart

From a field-geology perspective, the new generation of Windows tablets and “transformable laptops” hold great promise given the new internal compass and orientation sensors.  Automatically determining and saving locations and orientations (dip direction and inclination angle) are the most obvious examples.  Unfortunately, several days of searching the web for a comparison of the sensors offered by the various tablet and transformable-laptop manufacturers has proven to be a fruitless and frustrating endeavor. With this in mind, I’ve decided to start my own, meager comparison chart, starting with the Dell Venue 8. Hopefully, we’ll be expanding this list with feedback from other interested geo-field-geeks and maybe, just maybe, some of the hardware manufacturers.

Sensor

Field

Dell Venue 8

 

Accelerometer

(HID Sensor Collection)

AccelerationX

YES

 

AccelerationY

YES

 

AccelerationZ

YES

 

AngleAccelX

no

 

AngleAccelY

no

 

AngleAccelZ

no

 

Motion

no

 

Speed

no

 

UpdateInterval

YES

 

Ambient Light

(HID Sensor Collection)

Lux

YES

 

Temperature

no

 

Chromacity

no

 

Compass

(HID Sensor Collection)

TiltX

no

 

TiltY

no

 

TiltZ

no

 

DistanceX

no

 

DistanceY

no

 

DistanceZ

no

 

HeadingX

no

 

HeadingY

no

 

HeadingZ

no

 

MagHeading

no

 

TrueHeading

YES

 

CompTrueHeading

no

 

Gyrometer

(HID Sensor Collection)

AccelerationX

no

 

AccelerationY

no

 

AccelerationZ

no

 

AngleAccelX

no

 

AngleAccelY

no

 

AngleAccelZ

no

 

Motion

no

 

Speed

no

 

UpdateInterval

YES

 

Inclinometer

(HID Sensor Collection)

TiltX

YES

 

TiltY

YES

 

TiltZ

YES

 

DistanceX

no

 

DistanceY

no

 

DistanceZ

no

 

HeadingX

no

 

HeadingY

no

 

HeadingZ

no

 

MagHeading

no

 

TrueHeading

no

 

CompTrueHeading

no

 

Location

(Windows Location Provider)

Authorized

YES

 

Accuracy

YES(1)

 

Distance

YES(1)

 

PowerConsumption

no

 

LocationChange

YES

 

Latitude

YES(2)

 

Longitude

YES(2)

 

ErrorRadius

YES

 

Altitude

YES(1)

 

Speed

no

 

TrueHeading

no

 

MagneticHeading

no

 

Address1

no

 

Address2

no

 

City

no

 

StateProvince

no

 

PostalCode

no

 

CountryRegion

no

 

Orientation

(HID Sensor Collection)

TiltX

no

 

TiltY

no

 

TiltZ

no

 

DistanceX

no

 

DistanceY

no

 

DistanceZ

no

 

HeadingX

no

 

HeadingY

no

 

HeadingZ

no

 

MagHeading

no

 

TrueHeading

no

 

CompTrueHeading

no

 

Orientation

(Simple Device Sensor)

TiltX

no

 

TiltY

no

 

TiltZ

no

 

DistanceX

no

 

DistanceY

no

 

DistanceZ

no

 

HeadingX

no

 

HeadingY

no

 

HeadingZ

no

 

MagHeading

no

 

TrueHeading

no

 

CompTrueHeading

no

 

Notes:

  1. Always returns zero therefore worthless.
  2. Based on IP address therefore worthless for geological applications.


 

Collect AND Process Data Directly in the Field


We’re currently finalizing the following free additions to RockWork16 (Level-2 and higher) for use with Windows7 or Windows8 compatible tablets and laptop computers.  These additions include the following three new utilities featuring tablet-friendly (large) buttons & fonts;


  • Row-Based Datasheet Editor
  • User-Defined Pick Lists
  • Sensor Detector: Imports data from internal or external USB/Bluetooth sensors directly into RockWorks datasheet.  On-the-fly conversions include;
    • Tiltmeter/Compass -> Dip Direction/Angle
    • Longitude/Latitude ->
      • UTM (feet or meters),
      • State Plane (feet or meters),
      • Local System (feet or meters),
      • Public Land Survey: Meridian, Range, Township, Section, Footage-Offset, & Quarter/Quarter description.

The remainder of this posting will describe each of these three new additions in detail;


The Column Parameters menu that is used to define column titles and content now includes an option titled “Pick List“.


This new “Pick List” designation works like this: If the user clicks on a cell within this column, the program will look for a text file within the RockWorks Tables folder whose name is defined by the Column Title and a “.PickList” suffix.  In the example above, that would be “USCS Soil Type.PickList”.  If the file exists, the program will load the contents into a pop-up menu similar to that shown below.


The pick list uses the new tablet-friendly (e.g. big buttons, big fonts, and simplified interface).  From here, the user can click on an item to copy the text into the datasheet cell and close the pick list menu.  Another way to pick items is to use the cursor keys to select the desired item and then click on the green check-mark button.  If you don’t want to select an item press the red X button.  If you wish to change the font size or menu size, click the blue gear button.  Examples of the five-possible font sizes are shown below.  The larger sizes may seem obnoxious, but you may change your tune if it’s cold, and you’re using a 6″ tablet, and you’re over fifty.


Note: Only the text that precedes the colon character will be copied into the datasheet.  For example, if you were to click on the row labeled “ML: Silt” only “ML” would be copied into the datasheet.

RockWorks currently includes only one Pick List (USCS Soil Type.PickList) but you are free to add your own or send us your list and we’ll add it to the Tables folder.

Tip: If you want to add or edit an existing table and don’t know where the Tables folder is located, click on the Help / About / Diagnostics button.  This will provide a list of folder locations.

This Pick List capability also applies to the new Row Editor described below.  Between the new Row Editor, Sensor Detector, and the Pick List, we think we’ve made a pretty good stab at making RockWorks a bit more “tablet friendly”, especially on smaller tablets.



A new program called the “Row Editor” has been added for editing rows of data within the RockWorks datasheet in a data-entry format.  Unlike previous RockWorks menus, the Row Editor uses large fonts and buttons for easier viewing and data-entry on tablet computers for field acquisition and processing.


As data is changed within the Row Editor, it will simultaneously change within the RockWorks datasheet.

The menu items within the Row Editor are described as follows;

  1. First Row Button: Display data for first row within datasheet.
  2. Previous Row Button: Display data for previous row within datasheet.
  3. Next Row Button: Display data for next row within datasheet.
  4. Last Row Button: Display data for last row within datasheet.
  5. Sensor Detector Button: Activate Sensor (e.g. GPS) – described within previous item in this revision list.
  6. Font Size: Active font-size selection menu.  Once a font size has been selected, the content of the Row Editor will change accordingly.
  7. Close/Exit Button: This will close the Row Editor dialog.
  8. The first row within the Row Editor is a fixed, un-editable row that shows the corresponding record (row) number within the RockWorks datasheet.
  9. All of the special items (e.g. colors, patterns, line styles, etc.) will behave in a fashion identical to the datasheet editor.  For example, if you click on a cell with a pattern in it, the pattern-selection dialog will appear.



A new Sensor Detector has been added for acquiring data from the Windows7 and Windows8 sensor arrays (e.g. GPS coordinates, compass directions, and tilt-meters) and transferring this information into the RockWorks datasheet for subsequent processing.  Unlike previous RockWorks menus, the Sensor Detector uses an 18-point font and large (64×64 pixel), metro-style icons for easier viewing on tablet computers that are used for field acquisition and processing.  The new Sensor Detector is included with RockWorks Level-2 or higher.


The menu items within the Sensor Detector are described as follows;


Acquire: This is the main menu (shown above) that displays the information that is being detected from the Windows sensors.  These sensors may be contained within the tablet or linked, via USB or Bluetooth connections to the tablet.

     

Ok/Accept: Clicking on this button will copy the displayed sensor data to the designated RockWorks data columns within the currently activate datasheet row and close the Sensor Detector dialog.

    

Map: Clicking on this button will display a pull-down menu that provides options for plotting the currently displayed coordinates within Bing Maps, Google Maps, or Google Earth within a single click on the associated icon.



Refresh: Clicking on this button will re-sample the data from the Windows sensors and display it within the Acquire menu.

     

Setup: Clicking on the Setup button will display a pull-down menu that provides options for that determine the menu size, contents, formatting, and sampling interval;


Menu Size
: Full-Screen or 800×800 pixels (for displaying on a larger screen).  The menu will automatically rotate if the tablet is turned sideways.

Visible Fields: Determines which items will appear within the Acquire menu including; Date, Time, XY Coordinates, Error Radius, Elevation, Azimuth (Compass Bearing), Dip DIrection & Dip Amount, and Public Land Survey Location (Section, Range, Township, etc.).

Output Coordinates: RockWorks will automatically convert the sensor coordinates to either decimal degrees, degrees and decimal minutes, degrees – minutes – decimal seconds, local coordinates (feet or meters), US State Plane Coordinates (feet or meters), or Universal Transverse Mercator (feet or meters).

Units: The units used to designate the Error Radius and Elevation may be expressed in feet or meters.

Date Format: Dates may expressed using a Day/Month/Year format (European) or Month/Day/Year format (US).

Time Format: The sample time may be expressed using a 24-hour format (European) or 12-hour am/pm format (US).

Sampling Format: Data may be automatically re-sampled from the Windows sensors at designated intervals (between 1 and 60 seconds) or manually resampled by clicking on the Refresh button (described above).  If the sampling method is set to Automatic, the Refresh button will not be visible.  Instead, a Sampling Interval box will appear in it’s place.  Also note that the Automatic option is not available if the Public Land Survey (PLS) data has been selected from the Visible Fields due to the delay caused by PLS conversions.


     

Cancel/Close: This button will close the Sensor Detector dialog without copying any data to the RockWorks datasheet.


Connections: This is the menu that determines which sensor parameters will be used by RockWorks.  For example, let’s say that you want to view the tablet Azimuth (compass direction) within the Acquire menu.  You would click on the item labeled “Azimuth” within the Item list shown below and then chose the appropriate sensor.  This will vary because you may have more than sensor that is capable of measuring directions or you may have no sensors that provide a bearing in which case you would set the Sensor to the Undefined setting and forgo measuring azimuths or dips.  Another option would be to add an external GPS to your tablet via a USB or a Bluetooth wireless connection.


     

Refresh Sensor Listing: This option will re-poll the Windows sensor array and re-populate the Connections menus within the sensor information.  This is a useful tool for seeing exactly what’s being transmitted from finicky sensors, seeing what new sensors have become available, or seeing which sensors are no longer available (e.g. dead batteries, Bluetooth sensors out of transmission range).

Like snowflakes, every tablet is different.  For example, most tablets have internal tilt sensors (for video games) but not all tablets have satellite-based GPS antennas in which case you may elect to use a Bluetooth (wireless) or USB GPS antenna to send data to the Widows sensors.  RockWorks does not include any software to perform Bluetooth or serial-port linking/communication – that’s a Windows / hardware vendor installation responsibility that may require driver installation.

Item: This is a list of the fields that RockWorks uses to determine the various readings that are shown within the Acquire menu.  For example, the dip-direction and dip-angle are based on the device Azimuth (bearing), Tilt-X, Tilt-Y, and Tilt-Z variables.  The purpose of the Connections menu is to establish which sensors and their associated fields contain the data that RockWorks will use to define the designated item.  For example, the screenshot above was made with a Dell Venue 8 that has some internal sensors (the HID sensors) but we also have a wireless connection to a handheld GPS sensor (GPSDirect Sensor).  The coordinates from the built-in sensor are based on the IP address of the tablet (very inaccurate) whereas the coordinates from the handheld GPS are much better.

Sensor: This table contains a list of the sensors that Windows is currently aware of.  As you click on a sensor, the associated fields names and any current output is displayed within the Field table to the right.  Just remember this; for any given Item, you must define the Sensor and the Field that is associated with that sensor.

Field: This table contains a list of the fields that are available from the currently-selected sensor.  Please note that some of the fields may be blank or “null”.  That’s because Microsoft has created a list of possible fields whereas the hardware developers many not actually populate those fields with data.  In fact, there are many unused fields within the Microsoft sensor array serve as “placeholders” for future hardware improvements including biometric sensors, RFID sensors, etc.

The “Sensor Information” table below the Field table lists additional information about the sensor that cannot be selected as a field.  It is there just to show any additional information that is being transmitted from the sensor.

 

Projections: The coordinates that are provided by the Windows sensors are always expressed in decimal longitude/latitude degrees.  In order to convert these coordinates to other types or coordinates (e.g. UTM), RockWorks needs to know more about the target coordinate system.  This menu provides access to those settings.


    

Load Project Settings: This button will replace any of the settings described below with the coordinate system settings that have been established for the current RockWorks project.  This eliminates having to re-enter data if the coordinate system for you project is the same as what you’re acquiring with the Sensor Detector (which it will probably always be unless you’re just using the Sensor Detector for a quick measurement elsewhere).

Local Coordinate System Origin:  The coordinate output from the RockWorks Sensor Detector may be expressed in terms of a local coordinate system given a known “origin” or calibration point.  For example, let’s say that your local gas-station project coordinates are defined simply by feet east or north of the southwest property corner.  If you enter the longitude and latitude for that point within this menu, and configure the Acquire menu to show Local Coordinates, the Eastings (X) and Northings (Y) within the Acquire menu will be expressed in local coordinates.  Note: RockWorks will assume a Cartesian coordinate system whereby X coordinates increase in value to the east, and Y coordinates increase to the north.

State Plane Coordinate Zone: US State Plane systems are zone-specific, meaning that you’ll need to define the zone in which you’re working if you have elected (within the Acquire Setup menu) to output your Eastings and Northings in State Plane Coordinates.

 

     

Clicking on the State Plane Coordinate Zone button will display a menu in which you will be able to select the zone in which you’re working (see below).

          

UTM Datum & Zone:  If you have elected to display the XY coordinates within the Acquire menu as UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator) coordinates, it is important that the proper datum and zone be specified in order for RockWorks to convert the Windows sensor longitude/latitude to UTM coordinates.  This is accomplished by selecting the two buttons described below;

     

The Datum button will display a menu (as shown below) in which you can select the datum to be used when converting the Windows sensor longitude/Latitude to UTM coordinates.  The two most common projections for the U.S. are:

  •  Clark 1866 (NAD-27): Used within most USGS maps. NAD-27 coordinates may be as much as 200 meters from WGS-84 (NAD-83) datum of the exact same coordinate.
  • WGS-84 (NAD-83): Used by GPS (Global Positioning System) units and more recent USGS maps.


     

The Zone button will display a menu (as shown below) in which you can select the UTM zone that you’re working in.


The Sensor Detector may be activated from four different locations within RockWorks;

  1. Within the Datasheet / Edit pull-down menu.
  2. Within the popup menu that appears whenever you right-click within the Datasheet.
  3. Within the new Data Row Editor (described above).
  4. Within the button bar along the left edge of the Datasheet.



Dip-Based Gridding

We’re putting the final touches on a dip-based gridding algorithm (free update to RockWorks16) that biases the surface modeling based on the dip-direction and dip-angle of the control points. The algorithm also accommodates points for which the dip is unknown. Here’s how it works;

Consider the control points listed and mapped within the diagram below. Each of the points has a z-value (elevation) of zero. A contour map would be nonsensical because a gridded surface would be a horizontal plane.

dip_gridding_01

Now, let’s pretend that we have dip information (e.g. strike & dip or dip-direction & dip-angle) for some of these points as shown within the diagram below;

dip_gridding_02

The new dip-gridding algorithm will use the dip information (for the points that have it) to construct imaginary planes that are used to bias the modeling as shown by the example shown below.  Notice how the points without dip information constrain the modeling.

dip_gridding_03

The following new programs and modifications to existing program been made to accommodate the new dip gridding capability;

- A new program titled “Dip Direction & Angle -> Grid” has been added to the Utilities / Planes menu. This program will create a structural grid and contour map using the new dip-gridding algorithm and plot (as an option) strike-and-dip symbols at the control point locations (see below).

dip_gridding_04

- Five new options have been added to the Utilities / Map / Grid-Based Map menu;

dip_gridding_05

- A new algorithm titled “Dip” has been added to the Gridding Options menu along with a group of options pertaining to the nuances of dip gridding.

dip_gridding_06

- The Stratigraphy table within the RockWorks Borehole Manager now includes fields for entering optional dip-direction and dip-angle field for the superface (top) and subface (bottom) contacts.

dip_gridding_07

Note: To show the dip-direction/angle fields within the Stratigraphy Table;

(1) Select the Borehole Manager / View / Tab Manager option …

dip_gridding_08

(2) Select the Stratigraphy option from the Tab Manager and then click on the Edit Fields button …

dip_gridding_09

(3) Select the Enable All option from the “Optional FIelds for Stratigraphy” menu.

dip_gridding_10